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OHIO volunteers honored at 2016 Alumni Leaders Conference

As seen in Compass:

OHIO volunteers honored at 2016 Alumni Leaders Conference
May 25, 2016
By McKenzie Powell

[dropcap]T[/dropcap]he OHIO Alumni Association hosted the 2016 Alumni Leaders Conference (ALC) Awards Ceremony on Friday, May 20 during On The Green Weekend, OHIO’s annual spring Homecoming.

The ceremony celebrated the contributions of several enthusiastic and devoted Bobcats, including chapter, society and University-wide volunteers and organizations.

“This special celebration of volunteerism is in recognition of the outstanding work done by our OHIO volunteers across the country and, indeed, around the globe… These volunteer groups hosted 143 events in 2015,” said Jennifer Neubauer, assistant vice president of OHIO Alumni Relations and executive director of OUAA. “Thank you to each and every one of you for taking on these important volunteer jobs in support of this singular place we call OHIO.”

According to Neubauer, Association volunteers connect over 200,000 alumni through 26 chapters, 12 international alumni networks, eight academic-based societies and 9 special interest societies, totaling 51 alumni groups and more than 300 volunteers.

Out of these individuals and groups, the OHIO Alumni Awards Committee selected recipients for eight special awards to be presented at the ALC Awards Ceremony: the Templeton Networking Award, the Lindley Student Networking Award, the Alden Community Service Award, the Glidden Innovative Award, the Baker Philanthropy Award, the Konneker Volunteer of the Year Award, the Cutler Outstanding Chapter Award and the Cutler Outstanding Society Award.

“It’s wonderful to see so many OHIO alumni, friends and dedicated volunteers here tonight as we honor, recognize and thank a few of our remarkable alumni and friends who embody the Bobcat spirit of the volunteerism. Ohio University is fortunate to have your compassion and your unwavering service,” said Jeff Laturell, chair of the Awards Committee of the OUAA Board of Directors.

After brief introductions and recognitions, the ALC Awards Ceremony began with the Templeton Networking Award, an accolade presented to the chapter or society that excels in connecting alumni in new and unique ways. The Templeton Networking Award was awarded to the Los Angeles Chapter for their Annual Hollywood OU-ting, which engages over 100 alumni in the region.

Next up was the Lindley Student Networking Award, a prize created in 2009 to recognize a group who went above and beyond to connect OHIO alumni with current Bobcats. The award went to the Dayton Chapter for their Paint and Sip Scholarship Event, which was a distinctive cherry blossom-themed fundraiser held to raise money for the Greater Dayton Chapter Scholarship Fund.

Ohio University Women’s Club of Greater Cleveland won the Alden Community Service Award for Ears to You, a program where participants make earrings for themselves and to give to cancer patients.

“The Alumni Association calls on our chapters and societies to do more than connect alumni and students. We also ask these groups to engage in meaningful service projects in their communities,” Neubauer said. “The Association is proud to present the Alden Community Service Award each year to chapters and societies that have engaged in outstanding community service initiatives.”

Due to their creative Flat Webster Postcard campaign, the Honors Tutorial College Society of Alumni and Friends was presented with the Glidden Innovative Award, which honors alumni chapters and/or societies for the most innovative and well-received program. The Flat Webster Postcard campaign was styled off of the Flat Stanley project, featuring a postcard of Dean Jeremy Webster’s face along with information about the Society’s upcoming events and initiatives.

The Baker Philanthropy Award was presented to the chapter that demonstrated extraordinary efforts to raise funds for OHIO. Massachusetts Serving New England Chapter won this year’s Baker Philanthropy Award for Lobster Fest, an event that consists of alumni, friends and an annual Lobster Dinner.

Amy Hollis, who has taken leadership roles in multiple OHIO chapters and associations throughout Northeast Ohio, was awarded the Konneker Volunteer of the Year Award for her determination to go above and beyond in promoting OHIO while connecting alumni to their alma mater.

“A 1996 graduate of the Scripps College of Communication, Amy has been a tireless volunteer on behalf of the Cleveland Chapter, the Ohio University Women’s Club of Greater Cleveland and the Akron Association of Ohio University Women,” said Julie Mann Keppner, chair of the OHIO Alumni Association Board of Directors.

The Konneker Volunteer of the Year Award was created in 2015, making it the newest ALC award to date.

“I’ve had so much fun going out and meeting fellow Bobcats and connecting through events so it’s really just been a joy,” Hollis said.

The ALC Awards Ceremony ended with two final awards: the Cutler Outstanding Chapter Award and the Cutler Outstanding Society Award.

“The Alumni Association established the Cutler Outstanding Chapter Award in 1978 to distinguish alumni chapters that demonstrate initiative, exhibit quality and contribute to the overall participation of alumni renewing affiliations with their alma mater,” said OHIO President Roderick J. McDavis. “Today the award also recognizes excellence among the Association’s Societies of Alumni and Friends.”

The Cutler Outstanding Chapter Award was presented to the Middle Tennessee Chapter and the Cutler Outstanding Society Award was given to the Honors Tutorial College Society of Alumni and Friends.

Following the ALC Awards Ceremony, guests were surprised with a new location for the Celebration of Volunteerism Dinner. Because of the rainy weather, the dinner was moved to the Templeton-Blackburn Alumni Memorial Auditorium stage, ending the night with a lovely celebration surrounded by College Green décor.

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Haseleys travel the world as global educators, establish OHIO scholarship

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Haseleys travel the world as global educators, establish OHIO scholarship
May 11, 2016
By McKenzie Powell

[dropcap]L[/dropcap]uther and Jeanne Haseley have experienced first-hand the life-changing opportunities that can flourish from higher education—and they have embraced those opportunities as a team, traveling to Botswana, Nigeria and Japan with their family. Holding their global experiences near and dear to their hearts, the couple created the Luther and Jeanne Haseley Scholarship to assist future Bobcats like themselves.

“I feel a tremendous loyalty to Ohio University to be very truthful; it’s treated me very, very well. I think this is a very small way of giving something back,” said Luther, M.A. ’57, who is an emeriti professor for the Gladys W. and David H. Patton College of Education.

The Haseleys first came to OHIO after meeting one another at Capital University in Columbus, Ohio. Following their undergraduate graduations, life changed pace with the addition of marriage, children and a new life in Athens.

Luther began working towards his master’s degree at OHIO and the two enjoyed their time as a young married couple in Appalachia – even though they spent part of it living in an all-boys dormitory.

“We got married the second year here. I was a resident assistant the first year and the second year I was the head resident. So, our first year of married life was in a boy’s dormitory, which was really kind of interesting,” Luther said.

After Luther’s graduate commencement, the couple lived and worked throughout Ohio and West Virginia, and Luther received his doctoral degree in education while teaching and working for University of Toledo’s counseling center.

Before long, they found themselves back at OHIO. Luther accepted a position working as a faculty member and the Haseleys’ lives were changed forever. Suddenly, the family was on a plane, waving goodbye to the United States.

“I was hired at OHIO and they liked me so much that they sent me to Nigeria for the first two years. So I was in Nigeria from 1965 to 1967 with my wife and three children,” Luther said. “It was our first time on a plane.”

“For all of us,” Jeanne, M. Ed. ’70, continued. “We were so inexperienced at air travel that we were having lunch with our parents at the Columbus airport and we thought we’d be able to see the plane when it came in…but the plane had come in on the other side. All the sudden we heard an announcement, ‘Last call for the Haseley family.’”

“We grabbed our suitcases and ran to the gate,” Luther finished with a laugh.

During the next two years in Nigeria, Luther worked on an OHIO project that developed teacher-training colleges in both the north and south of the country. Luther was the administrator of the project in the north and coordinated in-service activities for teachers in the field. The project developed through collaboration between Ohio University and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID).

“The training centers were really kind of sophisticated. We had a language laboratory and a closed-circuit television where we could evaluate teacher techniques,” Luther said. “I mean this was really new; this was absolutely something that they never had before.”

During these two years, Jeanne homeschooled their three children and joined an organization called the YWCA. This group conducted classes in English for the wives of the Emir of Kano, the city in Northern Nigeria where they were living.

“It was the only chance for the women to have some contact with the outside world. They enjoyed their time with us and we enjoyed our time with them because we learned a lot about the customs of Nigeria and what life was like inside the palace,” Jeanne said.

Before they knew it, the Haseleys had caught the travel bug. Three years after leaving Nigeria, the family traveled to Japan and stayed for one year.

In Japan, Luther coordinated a collaborative project between the U.S. Department of Education, the Pentagon and OHIO. Through this venture, Department of Defense elementary school teachers took classes in their respective countries, including Japan, Okinawa, South Korea and the Philippines, with OHIO professors from the Department of Counseling and Higher Education in the Gladys W. and David H. Patton College of Education.

After a 15-month program, including two summer sessions, the students received a Master of Education degree from OHIO. A few years after returning from Japan, they traveled to Germany and Spain where Luther taught doctoral courses in psychology to U.S. Air Force personnel through Ball State University.

From 1983 to 1992, the family lived in Botswana. Luther was the In-Service Director for the Ministry of Education and was tasked with developing in-service education courses for teachers in remote areas of the country. This helped to enable and prepare teachers for passing the exams for teacher certification.

The OHIO team also created a two-year primary education certificate program at the University of Botswana for prospective education students. This program was one of the few University Primary Education programs in Africa at the time.

“It was a project where Botswana sent people to Ohio University to get their advanced degrees and then, when they returned to Botswana, they took the place of the Ohio University staff members who were working there,” Jeanne said.

“It was a very, very positive experience,” Luther added.

In Botswana, Jeanne helped develop a special education program for children and taught special education courses to teacher trainees at a teacher training college.

“They were a little bit ahead of the U.S. Instead of having special classes for all the kids with special needs, they wanted to integrate them into regular classrooms. So, the challenge was how to teach the special needs children while you were also teaching the other children,” Jeanne said.

Jeanne continued training teachers in special education, while the OHIO team expanded the University of Botswana by developing a four-year bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in primary education. Since then, the University of Botswana has even created a doctoral program.

When the family returned to the U.S., Luther took an early retirement, but he wasn’t finished teaching just yet. Instead, he got involved with a new initiative executed by OHIO to develop a PhD program for the University of Mexico in Mérida, Mexico.

“It was unique [because] emeriti faculty were the ones that went over and did the teaching and I was like the coordinator of that program. The students then had to come to Ohio University to do their dissertation,” Luther said. “It was really exciting because all of the students got their PhDs and then went back to the University of Mexico to teach.”

Since their time abroad, Luther and Jeanne have continued to travel as frequently as possible while also contributing a great deal of energy and dedication to the University. The couple continues to find ways to give back to OHIO programs and future Bobcats through gifts like the Luther and Jeanne Haseley Scholarship.

“I really enjoyed my time at the University. When I was teaching there I enjoyed the people I was working with and I had great relationships with the students. I think it’s a community that I feel very much at home in and this is a small way of giving back,” Luther said.

The Luther and Jeanne Haseley Scholarship will provide awards to full-time undergraduate students with demonstrated financial need who are enrolled in or have been accepted for admission at OHIO. Because of the couple’s strong ties to education, the student must also be accepted for admission to the Gladys W. and David H. Patton College of Education.

“Ohio University provided me with a lot of opportunities for increasing my effectiveness as a teacher and my intellectual stimulation by being with others who were doing the same thing,” Jeanne said. “In many cases, kids from low-income families maybe don’t have the impetus from their parents or from their home to get an education like we did and we hope this will help.”

Through the OHIO Match program, the University will also match the Haseley’s gift by contributing 50 cents to every dollar donated. The OHIO Match program has dedicated $25 million towards OHIO’s endowed scholarship program as a part of the Promise Lives Campaign, which exceeded its primary goal and raised over $500 million in gifts and commitments in 2015.

Sidebar:

Developing Educators in Japan

The Haseleys spent a great deal of their time traveling the world, gaining new experiences and spreading their love and dedication toward education and teaching.

One of the family’s many homes was Japan, where Luther coordinated a collaborative project between the U.S. Department of Education, the Pentagon and OHIO. Through this venture, Department of Defense elementary school teachers took classes in their respective countries, including Japan, Okinawa, South Korea and the Philippines, with OHIO professors from the Department of Counseling and Higher Education in the Gladys W. and David H. Patton College of Education.

After a 15-month program, including two summer sessions, the elementary school teachers received a Master of Education degree from OHIO. Luther devoted much of his life toward developing programs like these, which created several ties between Bobcat professors and international OHIO graduate students and educators.

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Immigrant sisters give gift of education through OHIO Match

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Immigrant sisters give gift of education through OHIO Match
Feb 11, 2016
By McKenzie Powell

[dropcap]I[/dropcap]n December 1951, the Sretenovic family arrived on Ellis Island as immigrants in a foreign land filled with strangers speaking an unfamiliar language. On Christmas Eve, the family arrived in Piketon, Ohio, a small Appalachian Village approximately an hour west of Athens.

Despite not knowing a word of English and the relentless struggle to combat poverty, the Sretenovics worked tirelessly, never doubting that their children would one day earn college degrees.

Today, after years of receiving generous support to attend Ohio University, Milijana, Mileva and Mara Sretenovic – three out of six Sretenovic children – have decided to give back to other students in need through the newly established Sretenovic Family Scholarship.

“OHIO enabled me to be what/who I am today. I am forever indebted to those who were generous and kind enough to help us earn our degrees and this is a way of paying it forward,” said Mileva, AB ’68, who spent 38 years in the U.S. Navy, both active and reserve, post-graduation.

Although their parents never once doubted that their children were going to college, the prospect of a higher education didn’t always seem so likely to the children.

“They made so many sacrifices when you think about the hardships that they had coming to a country where they didn’t even speak the same language,” Milijana said. “We had absolutely no money for anything – even the basics.”

“My father was in a Prisoner of War Camp in Germany,” explained Mileva. “He was from Yugoslavia and, before becoming a Prisoner of War, he was serving as an ally soldier in Germany.”

When World War II ended, their father was released; shortly after the war, he met his German wife Christa. Mileva, Milijana & Mara were born in Germany. At some point the family had to make a move.

“Because Papa had been a Prisoner of War, he had a choice. He decided we would move to America,” said Milijana, BSC ’69 and MA ’70, owner and creator of The Office Professionals, a full-service office employment agency.

Under the Displaced Persons Act of 1948, the Sretenovics moved to the United States. They were sponsored by the Piketon Methodist Church. Their father began learning how to speak English at a feed and grain mill and their mother began learning English through soap operas, but German remained the language of the household.

“They made so many sacrifices when you think about the hardships that they had coming to a country where they didn’t even speak the same language,” Milijana said. “We had absolutely no money for anything – even the basics.”

“I was very fortunate that I was able to go to college and it did have a really big impact on me. I’d like to see other people have the same opportunities,” Mara said.

Affording college wasn’t easy for Milijana, Mileva and Mara, and it might not have been possible if it weren’t for scholarships similar to the Sretenovic Family Scholarship. Due to scholarship money, work-study programs and several jobs each, the sisters were able to attend and graduate from OHIO.

“We all worked very hard. I was never even able to go to football games because I was always working,” Mileva said. “Going to class was like the break between work.”

Although the sisters had to persistently work their way through college, their experience as Bobcats still resulted in strong OHIO ties and memories.

“Ohio University, for me, was a very good experience in a lot of different ways,” said Mara, BFA ’71, who worked in the telecommunications industry for 40 years, in positions ranging from customer service to marketing. “I was very fortunate that I was able to go to college and it did have a really big impact on me. I’d like to see other people have the same opportunities.”

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5 interesting cities to visit in Ireland

As seen in USA TODAY College:

5 interesting cities to visit in Ireland
By McKenzie Powell, Ohio University August 10, 2015 10:11 am

[dropcap]T[/dropcap]ogether, the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland create a tiny island bursting with picturesque sceneries, undeniably kind citizens and a thrilling nightlife.

While it is impossible to narrow down all of the destinations worth visiting in Ireland, there are a few you should keep in mind. If you’re planning a holiday here (as the Irish would say), you won’t want to miss out on a visit to each of the following five cities.

1. Dublin 

Dublin, Ireland’s capital city, has a very interesting history and currently stands as a progressive, bustling metropolis with endless options for arts, entertainment, shopping and the like.

View of Dublin, Ireland from the Guinness Storehouse Gravity Bar

View of Dublin, Ireland from the Guinness Storehouse Gravity Bar

Tourists can visit the National Museum of Ireland to discover more about the Vikings’ settlement in Dublin or take a tour of Trinity College and see Ireland’s largest library, the Trinity College Library.

Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland

Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland

Dublin also has never-ending options for pubs and restaurants, with some street performers and markets sprinkled throughout. Tour buses are available throughout the city, as well as a cheap and useful train system that can take you to attractions like the Guinness Storehouse, Old Jameson Distillery and the famous St. Patrick’s Cathedral.

Dublin, Ireland

Dublin, Ireland

2. Belfast 

Belfast is located in Northern Ireland and is currently serving as Northern Ireland’s capital city. Like many other cities in Northern Ireland, Belfast was a part of The Troubles, a thirty-year conflict between the unionist/Protestants and the nationalist/Catholics over Northern Ireland’s identity and belonging.

“There are two main communities with different versions of the troubles,” says Gerry Lynn, a customer services assistant who gives informational tours about The Troubles in Derry for the Tower Museum. “It has a character of its own and is well worth a visit.”

Botanic Gardens

Belfast Botanic Gardens

Because of Belfast’s intense past, much of the city’s history still lingers through murals and various landmarks. Like Dublin, many buses are available for tours around the city, as well as the Belfast Famous Black Cab Tour, which specifically focuses on The Troubles in Belfast.

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Titanic Belfast

Belfast is well known for Titanic Belfast, a museum-like experience that explains the Titanic’s story, beginning with the boat’s construction in Belfast, and is also home to television series Game of Thrones. Visitors might also enjoy walking through the Botanic Gardens, spending an afternoon in the Ulster Museum and photographing the Belfast Cathedral.

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Queen’s University in Belfast

3. Galway

Located on the western coast of Ireland, Galway is an adorable city with diverse cultural influences and a flourishing shopping, restaurant and bar scene. The city, which was originally a tiny fishing village, is also home to several beaches along Galway Bay.

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Artist in Galway

Galway hosts several festivals throughout the year, including the Galway Film Fleadh and the Galway Arts Festival which both occur during the summer months. Visitors can also walk to see St. Nicholas’ Church, the exciting Galway Market complete with fresh produce and artisan crafts, and the historical Spanish Arch that previously served as a bastion for the city.

Galway is also very close to other gorgeous sites like the Cliffs of Moher, Connemara and the Aran Islands. Day tours are readily available from Galway to all three locations.

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Galway, Ireland

4. Derry

Derry, or Londonderry, is another city in Northern Ireland that underwent The Troubles and experienced a difficult history of division between Protestants and Catholics.

“From the sixth to the 16th century, it was the cradle of Christianity. It was the last walled city in Europe to be built; we have had the longest siege in British history,” Lynn says.

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The Peace Bridge in Derry

Tourists can visit a bundle of attractions that tell of Derry’s trying past, including The Tower Museum, which has a permanent exhibit detailing the entire history of Derry, the Peace Bridge, a bridge that connects the two previously divided parts of the city and, of course, this historic City Walls.

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Derry, Northern Ireland

Derry has many other sights to see, as well, including the murals near the bogside, St. Columb’s Cathedral, and the beautiful Guildhall building, which contains spectacular stained glass.

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Derry, Northern Ireland

5. Tory Island 

If you need a quick, peaceful getaway, Tory Island will more than likely have just what you need. Although the island is extremely tiny, it holds at least a days worth of activities and sightseeing to keep you busy, including guides discussing Tory’s myths and legends, a scenic walk to the island’s lighthouse and a downright stunning visit to the island’s cliffs.

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Cliffs of Tory Island

When you aren’t exploring Tory, there are many areas throughout the island to just relax and enjoy the view – whether you’d prefer grass, the beach or the cliffs – and you just might even catch sight of a seal or some puffins. The King of Tory is quite often present, as well, and is known for greeting visitors right off the boat.

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Tory Island, Ireland

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